1 Chronicles 28:20

Then David said to his son Solomon, “Be strong and courageous, and act; do not fear nor be dismayed, for the LORD God, my God, is with you. He will not fail you nor forsake you until all the work for the service of the house of the LORD is finished.

This is perfect advice from father to a son. David has told the all the leaders that Solomon will be building the temple. This is part of what he then addresses directly to Solomon. David had lived a lifetime of being a man after God’s heart. He knew God’s character, and this allowed him to give Solomon this hope.

What can we learn from this? Can this apply to us today? We know that God’s character hasn’t changed. While God was with them in the Old Testament, He is in us through the Holy Spirit. He has promised never to leave us or forsake us (Heb 13:5). He has also planned good works for us to do (Eph 2:10).

So, our work for the Lord is never finished this side of heaven. He has promised never to leave us, and He is always with us. Therefore, we also should always be strong and courageous, we should act, and we should not fear nor be dismayed.

Spiritual Maturity, part 1

I have not written for a few days. As I went back to the scripture prompts for those days, they seemed to be in a theme. The one for today was Hebrews 11:1

1 Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen. (ESV)

This scripture talks about our faith. So many people seem to think this is talking about some sort of “blind faith.” In fact, many unbelievers think that faith is the belief in something that is not real. Biblical faith is nothing of the sort.

The things “not seen” in this verse are the things of the future. No one can see what comes after their death. We have some descriptions in the Bible. We hope for those things, because we cannot see them.

The verse also talks about assurance and conviction. Assurance and conviction are not words used of blind faith. They are words used about faith that has “seen” the reality of what is believed. That describes mature Biblical faith. So, what have we “seen”?

For me, I have seen the historical reality of my faith. I have looked at the evidence for Jesus life, death, and resurrection and found that evidence overwhelmingly compelling. I have read the Old Testament prophecies and seen how they have been fulfilled, giving me confidence in the God who inspired the Bible. I have studied the New Testament and seen the descriptions of churches that match what I know of people and churches today. That lets me know that I can trust the teachings, because the New Testament authors faced the same types of people and situations that I do.

Most importantly, I see how God has worked in my own life. I see his hand in guiding my life. I see the results where I have trusted Him, and unfortunately have seen the results when I have not trusted Him. I know the strength that He has provided me during trying times. I have seen the result of His goodness in my life.

Do I see perfectly? Of course not. Perhaps that is part of what is mean by 1 Corinthians 13:12 where it talks about now seeing in a mirror dimly, but then seeing face to face.

How do we increase in spiritual maturity? Part 2 to be posted tomorrow.

Mark 12:30-31

30 AND YOU SHALL LOVE THE LORD YOUR GOD WITH ALL YOUR HEART, AND WITH ALL YOUR SOUL, AND WITH ALL YOUR MIND, AND WITH ALL YOUR STRENGTH.’ 31 “The second is this, ‘YOU SHALL LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOR AS YOURSELF.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.” (NASB)

This is Jesus answer when asked about the greatest commandment. The scribe asking it agreed with Jesus answer, and the scribe commented that God wanted this obedience more than all sacrifices. Jesus told the scribe that he was close to the kingdom of God.

For the Jews that he spoke to, this would have been a summary of the Old Covenant Law. This was their standard, and anything short required repentance and sacrifice. The scribe’s comments seem to indicate that he understood the concept that sacrifices were not an end unto themselves.  They were required, because we could not keep this law perfectly. God preferred obedience, rather than sacrifice. Knowing this, the scribe was close to accepting who Jesus was. Perhaps when Peter spoke at Pentecost, this scribe accepted the Gospel and became a believer.

How can we apply this passage as New Covenant believers? We are not under a law of rules and regulations, but under the law of love. Does this passage not detail the “requirements” of the law of love? We, too, cannot keep this law perfectly, but our sacrifice has been made by Jesus, God Himself. Therefore, we are free to live this out (with the Holy Spirit’s help) without the shame and guilt of condemnation.